6 rules of relative age dating

The student is expected to: (A) classify different aquatic organisms using tools such as dichotomous keys; (B) compare and describe how adaptations allow an organism to exist within an aquatic environment; and (C) compare differences in adaptations of aquatic organisms to fresh water and marine environments. The student knows about the interdependence and interactions that occur in aquatic environments.The student is expected to: (A) identify how energy flows and matter cycles through both fresh water and salt water aquatic systems, including food webs, chains, and pyramids; and (B) evaluate the factors affecting aquatic population cycles. The student understands how human activities impact aquatic environments. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Science, High School, Beginning with School Year 2010-2011.The provisions of 112.32-112.39 of this subchapter shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2010-2011 school year.Suggested prerequisite: Chemistry or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry. In Aquatic Science, students study the interactions of biotic and abiotic components in aquatic environments, including impacts on aquatic systems.This course is recommended for students in Grades 10, 11, or 12. Investigations and field work in this course may emphasize fresh water or marine aspects of aquatic science depending primarily upon the natural resources available for study near the school.

All systems have basic properties that can be described in terms of space, time, energy, and matter.

The student is expected to: (A) identify the role of carbon, nitrogen, water, and nutrient cycles in an aquatic environment, including upwellings and turnovers; and (B) examine the interrelationships between aquatic systems and climate and weather, including El Nio and La Nia, currents, and hurricanes. The student knows the origin and use of water in a watershed.

The student is expected to: (A) identify sources and determine the amounts of water in a watershed, including rainfall, groundwater, and surface water; (B) identify factors that contribute to how water flows through a watershed; and (C) identify water quantity and quality in a local watershed. The student knows that geological phenomena and fluid dynamics affect aquatic systems.

Scientific methods of investigation can be experimental, descriptive, or comparative.

The method chosen should be appropriate to the question being asked. Scientific decision making is a way of answering questions about the natural world.

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