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From the standpoint of most collectors of antique bottles, the name and location of the company the bottle was made for, and the name of the product that was originally contained in the bottle (one or both of which may be embossed on the bottle) is often considered to be of more interest or importance than the glass factory where the bottle was actually manufactured.However, this site is geared with more emphasis on the actual themselves.Researcher/historian Tod Von Mechow has compiled a large quantity of in-depth information on antique beer bottles, including both pottery and glass bottles.I would encourage anyone interested in makers’ marks on beer bottles (and soda bottles) to check out his site…..This list primarily includes marks that represent the actual glass company that made the container.Many marks are encountered that indicate the company whose product was contained within it, or are trademarks (“brand names”) that give no indication of who actually made the glass, and those are (with quite a few exceptions) , not included in my list.Hopefully this database will be of some help to those who are attempting to assign an approximate date range to a particular bottle, assuming it carries an identifiable glass manufacturer’s mark. Co.” Also, the abbreviation “Co” (Company) sometimes may be found embossed with either an upper- or lower-case “O” on various bottles made by the same manufacturer.be a glass manufacturer’s mark and so may not be listed here. Many bottles carry only a number (or numbers) on the base.

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knocked on doors throughout the neighborhood selling their goods and wares on a daily basis.he has a Usually embossed on the base, marks may also appear on the lower heel area on certain types of bottles, especially sodas.On earlier flasks, fruit jars, and soda bottles, and especially examples produced in the mid-nineteenth century period (1840s-1860s), the full factory name or initials may be embossed across the front.The info presented on this site is the most accurate I’ve been able to find at present, but any comments (pro or con), clarifications or corrections (preferably backed up with , but please be aware that I’m not an appraisal service, and I may not respond to queries along the general lines of “what is this jar worth?” and “is this bottle worth the hassle of listing on ebay? Generally speaking, I may not be able to answer questions concerning bottles with only mold or catalog numbers embossed on the base.

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